Mom's Story

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Archive for the month “January, 2017”

Study Finds That Some Family Members of People with MS Show Possible Early Signs of the Disease without Symptoms

Summary

  • As part of a large-scale “Genes & Environment in MS” (GEMS) study to understand factors that lead to the development of multiple sclerosis, researchers analyzed the genes and backgrounds of individuals who had no symptoms of MS, but who had close family members with MS.
  • Based on that analysis, researchers identified a group of 40 women at higher risk for developing MS, and 25 women at lower risk. Extensive neurological testing and MRI scanning uncovered possible neurological abnormalities in the higher risk group, and MRI abnormalities in a small proportion of both groups.
  • “At this time, we are developing strategies to manage the risk of MS, but there is, as yet, no specific recommendation,” explains co-author Dr. Phillip De Jager. “Family members should be reassured that the vast majority of family members will not develop MS.”
  • The team (including Zongqi Xia, MD, PhD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Daniel S. Reich, MD, PhD, of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD) has published results in JAMA Neurology (published online January 17, 2017).
  • This study was supported by the National MS Society and the National Institutes of Health, and the Society helped to recruit participants. Two of the study authors – Daniel S. Reich, MD, PhD, and Philip L. De Jager, MD, PhD – are winners of the prestigious Barancik Prize for Innovation in MS Research.

Background: An individual’s risk of developing MS increases if a close family member has MS. There is currently no way to predict which family members will develop MS. The goal of the Genes & Environment in MS (GEMS) study is to identify the genetic, environmental and immune profiles that may increase a person’s risk of developing MS.  Researchers are recruiting 5,000 subjects who have at least one first-degree relative with a diagnosis of MS. The GEMS Study is gathering genetic material (DNA) and environmental exposure history from participants as well as blood samples and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an option. Investigators are classifying participants using the Genetic and Environmental Risk Score for MS Susceptibility (GERSMS), an experimental approach which incorporates genetic information and environmental exposures to identify people at higher or lower risk of developing MS.

The Study: As part of this large-scale, ongoing study, researchers looked at 65 women who are first-degree relatives of people with MS. The GERSMS indicated that 40 of these women were at higher risk of developing MS, and 25 women were at lower risk of developing MS. These women underwent a comprehensive neurologic examination and MRI scans.

Women in the higher risk group had less than normal vibration sensitivity in their big toes, a finding that indicates potential nerve dysfunction. A small percentage of the women in both groups had more MRI abnormalities associated with MS than one would expect to find in the general population.

The team (Zongqi Xia, MD, PhD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, and Daniel S. Reich, MD, PhD, of National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD) has published results in JAMA Neurology (published online January 17, 2017).

This study was supported by the National MS Society and the National Institutes of Health, and the Society helped to recruit participants. Two of the study authors – Daniel S. Reich, MD, PhD, and Philip L. De Jager, MD, PhD – are winners of the prestigious Barancik Prize for Innovation in MS Research.

Next Steps:  In this study, women at high risk for MS showed possible early manifestations of the disease. “The goal of the Genes & Environment Study is to understand the sequence of events that leads someone to develop MS,” explains co-author Dr. De Jager. “At this time, we are developing strategies to manage the risk of MS, but there is, as yet, no specific recommendation. Family members should be reassured that the vast majority of family members will not develop MS.” He notes that the study did not test the possibility of preventive strategies, such as vitamin D supplementation.  “Taking vitamin D is good for bone health, and MS family members should discuss taking such supplements with their physician.”

Read more about research to find the genetic and environmental underpinnings of MS

 

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New Study: Resilience in People with Chronic Disease is Linked to Social Satisfaction and Quality of Life – Not Physical Function

Summary

  • A survey of more than 1500 people with MS and other chronic diseases shows that resilience (the ability to solve problems and bounce back from difficult situations) is linked to satisfaction with social roles (such as work and family responsibilities) and quality of life, but not to physical function.
  • Understanding factors that promote resilience may help people with MS to not only cope with unpredictable changes in health and abilities, but to thrive in spite of these changes.  Learn more about how the resilience factor can help you to thrive. Watch an education program on Resilience: Addressing the Challenges of MS.
  • The team (Samuel Battalio, BS, and colleagues at the University of Washington) has published results in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (2016 Dec 16).

Background: Research on psychosocial issues forms a cornerstone of finding life-changing solutions for people with MS. MS can have a significant impact on a person’s emotions, not only because MS is unpredictable and challenging to live with, but because it affects parts of the brain that control mood. This study specifically looked at factors that can affect resilience (i.e., the ability tackle problems, find solutions and bounce back from difficult situations).

The Study: The team reviewed information on 1574 people with MS, muscular dystrophy, post poliomyelitis syndrome, and spinal cord injury, which was gathered from an ongoing survey that is tracking people in the United States who are aging with physical disabilities. Information was collected on resilience using a clinical scale, and on other factors (including physical function, satisfaction with social roles – meaning work and family responsibilities, and quality of life) using questionnaires that assess how people report their own health status.

The results suggest that people who reported significantly greater satisfaction with social roles and significantly greater quality of life had significantly higher resilience. This relationship was slightly different between men and women, in that men who expressed greater levels of satisfaction with social roles reported higher levels of resilience. Surprisingly, noted the authors, resilience was not significantly greater in people who reported better physical function.

The team (Samuel Battalio, BS, and colleagues at the University of Washington) has published results in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (2016 Dec 16).

Next Steps: The authors note that resilience is complex, and that further research could help uncover particular aspects of resilience that may be most beneficial to individuals.  Understanding factors that promote resilience may help people with MS to not only cope with unpredictable changes in health and abilities, but to thrive in spite of these changes.

There are behaviors that can help promote individuals’ resilience:

New Results Show that Magnetic Stimulation of Brain May Improve Working Memory and Brain Connectivity in People with MS

Summary

  • People with MS, but not healthy controls, showed improvements in working memory, brain activity, and “connectivity” (how parts of the brain interact with one another), after treatment with Repetitive Transcranial Magnet Stimulation (rTMS). This device generates electromagnet pulses that stimulate brain activity.
  • rTMS may have a future role in cognitive rehabilitation in people with MS, but further, larger studies are necessary to confirm the safety and effectiveness of this intervention and its long-term effects.
  • The team (Hanneke Hulst, MD, of VU Medical Center in Amsterdam, and others) has published results in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry (Published Online First: 14 December 2016).

Background: Repetitive Transcranial Magnet Stimulation (rTMS) was approved by the FDA as a treatment for major depression. A device that generates electromagnet pulses is placed on the scalp with the idea of stimulating specific brain activity. Studies have shown that people with MS who received rTMS showed significant decreases in depression. This team looked at whether rTMS improved working memory (short-term memory needed for tasks such as mental arithmetic), which can be affected in people with MS.

The Study: Investigators administered rTMS – or a “sham” version of lower intensity – to an area of the brain associated with working memory in17 people with MS and 11 healthy controls. None of the participants showed signs of impaired memory at the outset of the study. A potential adverse event of rTMS is seizures, so participants were excluded if they were taking medicine that put them at risk for seizures, or had MS brain lesions in particular areas. Before and after, participants underwent imaging and extensive neuropsychological testing aimed at investigating memory. They also completed a working memory task while undergoing functional MRI, which measures brain activity during tasks.

At the beginning of the study, there were no differences in working memory between people with MS and controls. After treatment, the results suggested improvements among people with MS in working memory, brain activity, and “connectivity” (how parts of the brain interact with one another). These changes were not seen in controls.

The team (Hanneke Hulst, MD, of VU Medical Center in Amsterdam, and others) has published results in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry

Next Steps: The authors comment that this small study implies that rTMS may play a future role in cognitive rehabilitation in people with MS. However, the study is limited by the small sample size and the fact that participants did not have obvious cognitive problems. Further studies that address these factors are necessary to confirm the safety and effectiveness of this intervention for people with MS and its long-term impact on day to day activities.

Read more about cognitive changes that affect people with MS

 

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